Patient H.M.

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Patient H.M.
Author: Luke Dittrich
Publisher: Random House
Release Date: 2016-08-09
ISBN 10: 067964380X
Pages: 480 pages

Patient H.M. Book Summary : “Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King”* in this propulsive, haunting journey into the life of the most studied human research subject of all time, the amnesic known as Patient H.M. For readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks comes a story that has much to teach us about our relentless pursuit of knowledge. Winner of the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award • Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • New York Post • NPR • The Economist • New York • Wired • Kirkus Reviews • BookPage In 1953, a twenty-seven-year-old factory worker named Henry Molaison—who suffered from severe epilepsy—received a radical new version of the then-common lobotomy, targeting the most mysterious structures in the brain. The operation failed to eliminate Henry’s seizures, but it did have an unintended effect: Henry was left profoundly amnesic, unable to create long-term memories. Over the next sixty years, Patient H.M., as Henry was known, became the most studied individual in the history of neuroscience, a human guinea pig who would teach us much of what we know about memory today. Patient H.M. is, at times, a deeply personal journey. Dittrich’s grandfather was the brilliant, morally complex surgeon who operated on Molaison—and thousands of other patients. The author’s investigation into the dark roots of modern memory science ultimately forces him to confront unsettling secrets in his own family history, and to reveal the tragedy that fueled his grandfather’s relentless experimentation—experimentation that would revolutionize our understanding of ourselves. Dittrich uses the case of Patient H.M. as a starting point for a kaleidoscopic journey, one that moves from the first recorded brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the cutting-edge laboratories of MIT. He takes readers inside the old asylums and operating theaters where psychosurgeons, as they called themselves, conducted their human experiments, and behind the scenes of a bitter custody battle over the ownership of the most important brain in the world. Patient H.M. combines the best of biography, memoir, and science journalism to create a haunting, endlessly fascinating story, one that reveals the wondrous and devastating things that can happen when hubris, ambition, and human imperfection collide. Praise for Patient H.M. “An exciting, artful blend of family and medical history.”—The New York Times “In prose both elegant and intimate, and often thrilling, Patient H.M. is an important book about the wages not of sin but of science.”—The Washington Post “Spellbinding . . . The fact that Dittrich looks critically at the actual process of scientific investigation is just one of the things to admire about Patient H.M.”—The New York Times Book Review “Patient H.M. tells one of the most fascinating and disturbing stories in the annals of medicine, weaving in ethics, philosophy, a personal saga, the history of neurosurgery, the mysteries of human memory, and an exploration of human ego.”—Sheri Fink, M.D., Pulitzer Prize winner and author of Five

Permanent Present Tense
Author: Suzanne Corkin
Publisher: Basic Books
Release Date: 2013-05-14
ISBN 10: 0465033490
Pages: 384 pages

Permanent Present Tense Book Summary : In 1953, 27-year-old Henry Gustave Molaison underwent an experimental “psychosurgical” procedure—a targeted lobotomy—in an effort to alleviate his debilitating epilepsy. The outcome was unexpected—when Henry awoke, he could no longer form new memories, and for the rest of his life would be trapped in the moment. But Henry’s tragedy would prove a gift to humanity. As renowned neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin explains in Permanent Present Tense, she and her colleagues brought to light the sharp contrast between Henry’s crippling memory impairment and his preserved intellect. This new insight that the capacity for remembering is housed in a specific brain area revolutionized the science of memory. The case of Henry—known only by his initials H. M. until his death in 2008—stands as one of the most consequential and widely referenced in the spiraling field of neuroscience. Corkin and her collaborators worked closely with Henry for nearly fifty years, and in Permanent Present Tense she tells the incredible story of the life and legacy of this intelligent, quiet, and remarkably good-humored man. Henry never remembered Corkin from one meeting to the next and had only a dim conception of the importance of the work they were doing together, yet he was consistently happy to see her and always willing to participate in her research. His case afforded untold advances in the study of memory, including the discovery that even profound amnesia spares some kinds of learning, and that different memory processes are localized to separate circuits in the human brain. Henry taught us that learning can occur without conscious awareness, that short-term and long-term memory are distinct capacities, and that the effects of aging-related disease are detectable in an already damaged brain. Undergirded by rich details about the functions of the human brain, Permanent Present Tense pulls back the curtain on the man whose misfortune propelled a half-century of exciting research. With great clarity, sensitivity, and grace, Corkin brings readers to the cutting edge of neuroscience in this deeply felt elegy for her patient and friend.

Remembering
Author: Donald G. MacKay
Publisher: Prometheus Books
Release Date: 2019-01-29
ISBN 10: 1633884082
Pages: 400 pages

Remembering Book Summary : The psychologist who worked with a famous amnesiac patient for fifty years explains what his studies show about how memory functions and ways to keep the brain sharp. At age twenty-seven, Henry Molaison underwent brain surgery to remedy life-threatening epilepsy. This operation inadvertently destroyed his hippocampus, the engine in the brain for forming new memories. Henry--until recently, known only as Patient H.M.--suffered catastrophic memory failures for the rest of his life and he became the most studied amnesia patient in the history of the world. Dr. Donald MacKay's studies with Henry span fifty years. They reveal the profound importance of memory. Memory decline impacts everything that makes a normal human mind and brain worth having: creative expression; artistic endeavors; awareness; and the ability to plan, to comprehend, to detect and correct errors, to appreciate humor, to imagine hypothetical situations, and to perceive novelty in the world. His research also shows how to keep memories sharp at any age and how to offset the degradation that aging and infrequent use inflict on memory. Remembering summarizes other results of the revolution in scientific understanding of mind and memory that began with Henry. Importantly, it makes good on the promise that research with Henry would help others by focusing on what readers who wish to maintain the everyday functioning of memory, mind, and brain (their own or others') can learn from the still ongoing revolution that he inspired.

Patient H.M.
Author: Luke Dittrich
Publisher: Random House
Release Date: 2016-08-09
ISBN 10: 067964380X
Pages: 480 pages

Patient H.M. Book Summary : “Oliver Sacks meets Stephen King”* in this propulsive, haunting journey into the life of the most studied human research subject of all time, the amnesic known as Patient H.M. For readers of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks comes a story that has much to teach us about our relentless pursuit of knowledge. Winner of the PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award • Los Angeles Times Book Prize Winner NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post • New York Post • NPR • The Economist • New York • Wired • Kirkus Reviews • BookPage In 1953, a twenty-seven-year-old factory worker named Henry Molaison—who suffered from severe epilepsy—received a radical new version of the then-common lobotomy, targeting the most mysterious structures in the brain. The operation failed to eliminate Henry’s seizures, but it did have an unintended effect: Henry was left profoundly amnesic, unable to create long-term memories. Over the next sixty years, Patient H.M., as Henry was known, became the most studied individual in the history of neuroscience, a human guinea pig who would teach us much of what we know about memory today. Patient H.M. is, at times, a deeply personal journey. Dittrich’s grandfather was the brilliant, morally complex surgeon who operated on Molaison—and thousands of other patients. The author’s investigation into the dark roots of modern memory science ultimately forces him to confront unsettling secrets in his own family history, and to reveal the tragedy that fueled his grandfather’s relentless experimentation—experimentation that would revolutionize our understanding of ourselves. Dittrich uses the case of Patient H.M. as a starting point for a kaleidoscopic journey, one that moves from the first recorded brain surgeries in ancient Egypt to the cutting-edge laboratories of MIT. He takes readers inside the old asylums and operating theaters where psychosurgeons, as they called themselves, conducted their human experiments, and behind the scenes of a bitter custody battle over the ownership of the most important brain in the world. Patient H.M. combines the best of biography, memoir, and science journalism to create a haunting, endlessly fascinating story, one that reveals the wondrous and devastating things that can happen when hubris, ambition, and human imperfection collide. Praise for Patient H.M. “An exciting, artful blend of family and medical history.”—The New York Times “In prose both elegant and intimate, and often thrilling, Patient H.M. is an important book about the wages not of sin but of science.”—The Washington Post “Spellbinding . . . The fact that Dittrich looks critically at the actual process of scientific investigation is just one of the things to admire about Patient H.M.”—The New York Times Book Review “Patient H.M. tells one of the most fascinating and disturbing stories in the annals of medicine, weaving in ethics, philosophy, a personal saga, the history of neurosurgery, the mysteries of human memory, and an exploration of human ego.”—Sheri Fink, M.D., Pulitzer Prize winner and author of Five

Summary and Analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets
Author: Worth Books
Publisher: Open Road Media
Release Date: 2017-05-16
ISBN 10: 1504046463
Pages: 30 pages

Summary and Analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets Book Summary : So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of Patient H.M. tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Luke Dittrich’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter overviews Profiles of the main characters Detailed timeline of key events Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About Patient H.M. by Luke Dittrich: Patient H.M. tells the extraordinary true story of Henry Molaison, a young man who underwent a lobotomy in 1953 in hopes of curing his epilepsy. Instead, he suffered extensive memory loss and would became the most studied patient in the history of neuroscience. Luke Dittrich, whose grandfather performed the surgery, artfully combines family history, medical science, and investigative journalism to create a suspenseful and unsettling narrative on the search to understand the most elusive of scientific research topics: the human memory. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography
Author: Larry R. Squire
Publisher: Elsevier
Release Date: 1998-10-16
ISBN 10: 0080534058
Pages: 433 pages

The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography Book Summary : This book is the second volume of autobiographical essays by distinguished senior neuroscientists; it is part of the first collection of neuroscience writing that is primarily autobiographical. As neuroscience is a young discipline, the contributors to this volume are truly pioneers of scientific research on the brain and spinal cord. This collection of fascinating essays should inform and inspire students and working scientists alike. The general reader interested in science may also find the essays absorbing, as they are essentially human stories about commitment and the pursuit of knowledge. The contributors included in this volume are: Lloyd M. Beidler, Arvid Carlsson, Donald R. Griffin, Roger Guillemin, Ray Guillery, Masao Ito. Martin G. Larrabee, Jerome Lettvin, Paul D. MacLean, Brenda Milner, Karl H. Pribram, Eugene Roberts and Gunther Stent. Key Features * Second volume in a collection of neuroscience writing that is primarily autobiographical * Contributors are senior neuroscientists who are pioneers in the field

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales
Author: Oliver Sacks
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Release Date: 1998
ISBN 10: 0684853949
Pages: 243 pages

The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat: And Other Clinical Tales Book Summary : Presents a series of stories about men and women who, representing both medical and literary oddities, raise fundamental questions about the nature of reality

The Telling Room
Author: Michael Paterniti
Publisher: Dial Press
Release Date: 2013-07-30
ISBN 10: 081299454X
Pages: 368 pages

The Telling Room Book Summary : NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • Entertainment Weekly • Kirkus Reviews • The Christian Science Monitor In the picturesque village of Guzmán, Spain, in a cave dug into a hillside on the edge of town, an ancient door leads to a cramped limestone chamber known as “the telling room.” Containing nothing but a wooden table and two benches, this is where villagers have gathered for centuries to share their stories and secrets—usually accompanied by copious amounts of wine. It was here, in the summer of 2000, that Michael Paterniti found himself listening to a larger-than-life Spanish cheesemaker named Ambrosio Molinos de las Heras as he spun an odd and compelling tale about a piece of cheese. An unusual piece of cheese. Made from an old family recipe, Ambrosio’s cheese was reputed to be among the finest in the world, and was said to hold mystical qualities. Eating it, some claimed, conjured long-lost memories. But then, Ambrosio said, things had gone horribly wrong. . . . By the time the two men exited the telling room that evening, Paterniti was hooked. Soon he was fully embroiled in village life, relocating his young family to Guzmán in order to chase the truth about this cheese and explore the fairy tale–like place where the villagers conversed with farm animals, lived by an ancient Castilian code of honor, and made their wine and food by hand, from the grapes growing on a nearby hill and the flocks of sheep floating over the Meseta. What Paterniti ultimately discovers there in the highlands of Castile is nothing like the idyllic slow-food fable he first imagined. Instead, he’s sucked into the heart of an unfolding mystery, a blood feud that includes accusations of betrayal and theft, death threats, and a murder plot. As the village begins to spill its long-held secrets, Paterniti finds himself implicated in the very story he is writing. Equal parts mystery and memoir, travelogue and history, The Telling Room is an astonishing work of literary nonfiction by one of our most accomplished storytellers. A moving exploration of happiness, friendship, and betrayal, The Telling Room introduces us to Ambrosio Molinos de las Heras, an unforgettable real-life literary hero, while also holding a mirror up to the world, fully alive to the power of stories that define and sustain us. Praise for The Telling Room “Captivating . . . Paterniti’s writing sings, whether he’s talking about how food activates memory, or the joys of watching his children grow.”—NPR

Dignity Therapy
Author: Harvey Max Chochinov
Publisher: OUP USA
Release Date: 2012-01-04
ISBN 10: 0195176219
Pages: 199 pages

Dignity Therapy Book Summary : Maintaining dignity for patients approaching death is a core principle of palliative care. Dignity therapy, a psychological intervention developed by Dr. Harvey Max Chochinov and his internationally lauded research group, has been designed specifically to address many of the psychological, existential, and spiritual challenges that patients and their families face as they grapple with the reality of life drawing to a close. In the first book to lay out the blueprint for this unique and meaningful intervention, Chochinov addresses one of the most important dimensions of being human. Being alive means being vulnerable and mortal; he argues that dignity therapy offers a way to preserve meaning and hope for patients approaching death. With history and foundations of dignity in care, and step by step guidance for readers interested in implementing the program, this volume illuminates how dignity therapy can change end-of-life experience for those about to die - and for those who will grieve their passing.

Hughes, Mansel & Webster's Benign Disorders and Diseases of the Breast
Author: R. E. Mansel,David J. T. Webster,L. E. Hughes,Helen Sweetland
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
Release Date: 2009
ISBN 10: 070202774X
Pages: 353 pages

Hughes, Mansel & Webster's Benign Disorders and Diseases of the Breast Book Summary : By far the majority of women presenting with a breast complaint will be diagnosed as having a benign rather than malignant condition. Despite this, clinical and research interest has always favoured breast cancer, and few publications have attempted to cover benign breast disorders as an independent entity focusing instead on benign breast disease in relation to breast cancer and none provide the complete and pragmatic coverage found in this text.Hughes, Mansel and Webster's Benign Disorders and Diseases of the Breast represents the distillation of over 35 years of clinical experience and research in the Cardiff Clinic and is unique in its depth of coverage of the entire spectrum of benign breast complaints. The third edition of this critically acclaimed book provides practical and detailed management guidelines. Relevant investigations are discussed and clear advice is given for the most effective treatment strategies in each condition, including dealing with treatment failures and recurring problems. The underlying pathology and physiology are also discussed from the clinician's viewpoint to help understand clinical presentations and response to treatment.

The Disordered Mind
Author: Eric R. Kandel
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date: 2018-08-28
ISBN 10: 0374716102
Pages: 304 pages

The Disordered Mind Book Summary : A Nobel Prize–winning neuroscientist’s probing investigation of what brain disorders can tell us about human nature Eric R. Kandel, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his foundational research into memory storage in the brain, is one of the pioneers of modern brain science. His work continues to shape our understanding of how learning and memory work and to break down age-old barriers between the sciences and the arts. In his seminal new book, The Disordered Mind, Kandel draws on a lifetime of pathbreaking research and the work of many other leading neuroscientists to take us on an unusual tour of the brain. He confronts one of the most difficult questions we face: How does our mind, our individual sense of self, emerge from the physical matter of the brain? The brain’s 86 billion neurons communicate with one another through very precise connections. But sometimes those connections are disrupted. The brain processes that give rise to our mind can become disordered, resulting in diseases such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder. While these disruptions bring great suffering, they can also reveal the mysteries of how the brain produces our most fundamental experiences and capabilities—the very nature of what it means to be human. Studies of autism illuminate the neurological foundations of our social instincts; research into depression offers important insights on emotions and the integrity of the self; and paradigm-shifting work on addiction has led to a new understanding of the relationship between pleasure and willpower. By studying disruptions to typical brain functioning and exploring their potential treatments, we will deepen our understanding of thought, feeling, behavior, memory, and creativity. Only then can we grapple with the big question of how billions of neurons generate consciousness itself.

Cancer Management in Small Animal Practice - E-Book
Author: Carolyn J. Henry,Mary Lynn Higginbotham
Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences
Release Date: 2009-12-03
ISBN 10: 1437701981
Pages: 432 pages

Cancer Management in Small Animal Practice - E-Book Book Summary : Cancer Management in Small Animal Practice provides you with all the tools needed to diagnose, stage, and manage the many different disease entities known as "cancer." This manual is designed to provide you with easy-to-access, clinically relevant details for complete care of the small animal cancer patient, while considering the needs, concerns, and capabilities of the client. It provides quick reference sections for information not included in current oncology texts, including drug interactions and resources for participation in clinical trials. All information is well referenced and the reference section on the accompanying website includes links to the original and related articles. The latest information including diagnostic procedures, treatment modalities, and outcome predictions to help clients make the best decisions for their pets. Expert contributors, renowned for clinical, as well as academic and research expertise, offer a wide breadth and depth of expertise. Full-color format provides accurate visual depictions of specific diseases and procedures to enhance your diagnostic capabilities. Key Points highlight critical information, enabling quick, easy access. Systems approach to diagnosis and management offers logical, systematic, head-to-tail procedure for accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Extensive discussions of supportive care limit adverse events and increase patient survival and puts emergency information at the practitioner’s fingertips. Suggested readings highlight the latest information for further investigation and research. Comprehensive drug safety guidelines thoroughly discuss all information required to safely handle and administer cancer drugs. Helpful drug formularies offer available formulations, recommended dosages, toxicities, and relative costs. Chapter on how to access clinical trials provides helpful information and hope for patients and their caregivers.

The Making Of Memory
Author: Steven Rose
Publisher: Random House
Release Date: 2012-09-30
ISBN 10: 1446442551
Pages: 432 pages

The Making Of Memory Book Summary : Steven Rose's The Making of Memory is about just that, in both its senses: the biological processes by which we humans - and other animals - learn and remember, and how researchers can explore these mechanisms. But it is also about much more. When the first edition of this fascinating book won the Science book Prize in 1993, the judges described it as 'a riveting read...a first-hand account by a practicing scientist working at the forefront of medical research and Rose does not duck the issues which that raises.' Now ten years on, research has itself moved forward, and Rose has taken the opportunity to fully revise the book. But this is more than mere revision. Where ten years ago he argued the case for research on memory because it is the most extraordinary of human attributes, Rose's own research has now opened the doors to a potential new treatment for Alzheimer's Disease undreamed of a decade ago, and in an entirely new chapter he describes how this potential breakthrough has occurred.

Pathology: A Modern Case Study
Author: Howard Reisner
Publisher: McGraw Hill Professional
Release Date: 2014-09-22
ISBN 10: 0071821236
Pages: 672 pages

Pathology: A Modern Case Study Book Summary : A unique case-based molecular approach to understanding pathology Pathology: A Modern Case Study is a concise, focused text that emphasizes the molecular and cellular biology essential to understanding the concepts of disease causation. The book includes numerous case studies designed to highlight the role of the pathologist in the team that provides patient care. Pathology: A Modern Case Study examines the role of anatomic, clinical, and molecular pathologists in dedicated chapters and in descriptions of the pathology of specific organ systems. Features Coverage of pathology focuses on modern approaches to common and important diseases Each chapter delivers the most up-to-date advances in pathology Learning aids include chapter summaries and overviews, bolded terms, and a glossary Common clinically relevant disease are highlighted Disease discussion is based on organ compartment and etiology Coverage includes: Disease and the Genome: Genetic, Developmental and Neoplastic Disease Cell Injury, Death and Aging and the Body's Response Environmental Injury Clinical Practice: Anatomic Pathology Clinical Practice: Molecular Pathology Clinical Practice: Molecular Pathology Organ-specific pathology covering all major body systems Molecular pathology Essential for undergraduate medical students and clinicians who wish to expand their knowledge pathology, Pathology: A Modern Case Study delivers valuable coverage that is directly related to a patient’s condition and the clinical practice of pathology.

Adherence to Long-term Therapies
Author: ANONIMO,Organisation mondiale de la santé,World Health Organization,Who
Publisher: World Health Organization
Release Date: 2003
ISBN 10: 9789241545990
Pages: 198 pages

Adherence to Long-term Therapies Book Summary : This report is based on an exhaustive review of the published literature on the definitions, measurements, epidemiology, economics and interventions applied to nine chronic conditions and risk factors.