principles of computer system design

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Principles of Computer System Design
Author : Jerome H. Saltzer,M. Frans Kaashoek
Publisher : Morgan Kaufmann
Release Date : 2009-05-21
ISBN 10 : 9780080959429
Pages : 560 pages
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Principles of Computer System Design is the first textbook to take a principles-based approach to the computer system design. It identifies, examines, and illustrates fundamental concepts in computer system design that are common across operating systems, networks, database systems, distributed systems, programming languages, software engineering, security, fault tolerance, and architecture. Through carefully analyzed case studies from each of these disciplines, it demonstrates how to apply these concepts to tackle practical system design problems. To support the focus on design, the text identifies and explains abstractions that have proven successful in practice such as remote procedure call, client/service organization, file systems, data integrity, consistency, and authenticated messages. Most computer systems are built using a handful of such abstractions. The text describes how these abstractions are implemented, demonstrates how they are used in different systems, and prepares the reader to apply them in future designs. The book is recommended for junior and senior undergraduate students in Operating Systems, Distributed Systems, Distributed Operating Systems and/or Computer Systems Design courses; and professional computer systems designers. Features: Concepts of computer system design guided by fundamental principles. Cross-cutting approach that identifies abstractions common to networking, operating systems, transaction systems, distributed systems, architecture, and software engineering. Case studies that make the abstractions real: naming (DNS and the URL); file systems (the UNIX file system); clients and services (NFS); virtualization (virtual machines); scheduling (disk arms); security (TLS). Numerous pseudocode fragments that provide concrete examples of abstract concepts. Extensive support. The authors and MIT OpenCourseWare provide on-line, free of charge, open educational resources, including additional chapters, course syllabi, board layouts and slides, lecture videos, and an archive of lecture schedules, class assignments, and design projects.

Principles of Computer System Design
Author : J. H. Saltzer,Frans Kaashoek
Publisher : Morgan Kaufmann Pub
Release Date : 2009
ISBN 10 : 9780123749574
Pages : 526 pages
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Most computer systems are built using a handful of abstractions. The text describes how these abstractions are implemented, demonstrates how they are used in different systems, and prepares the reader to apply them in future designs.

Principles of Computer Systems and Network Management
Author : Dinesh Chandra Verma
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2010-01-23
ISBN 10 : 9780387890098
Pages : 260 pages
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Systems Management is emerging as the predominant area for computer science in the enterprise, with studies showing that the bulk (up to 80%) of an enterprise IT budget is spent on management/operational issues and is the largest piece of the expenditure. This textbook provides an overview of the field of computer systems and network management. Systems management courses are being taught in different graduate and undergraduate computer science programs, but there are no good books with a comprehensive overview of the subject. This text book will provide content appropriate for either an undergraduate course (junior or senior year) or a graduate course in systems management.

Intelligent Computer Systems in Engineering Design
Author : Staffan Sunnersjö
Publisher : Springer
Release Date : 2016-01-11
ISBN 10 : 3319281259
Pages : 156 pages
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This introductory book discusses how to plan and build useful, reliable, maintainable and cost efficient computer systems for automated engineering design. The book takes a user perspective and seeks to bridge the gap between texts on principles of computer science and the user manuals for commercial design automation software. The approach taken is top-down, following the path from definition of the design task and clarification of the relevant design knowledge to the development of an operational system well adapted for its purpose. This introductory text for the practicing engineer working in industry covers most vital aspects of planning such a system. Experiences from applications of automated design systems in practice are reviewed based on a large number of real, industrial cases. The principles behind the most popular methods in design automation are presented with sufficient rigour to give the user confidence in applying them on real industrial problems. This book is also suited for a half semester course at graduate level and has been complemented by suggestions for student assignments grown out of the lecture notes of two postgraduate courses given annually or biannually during the last ten years at the Product development program at the School of Engineering at Jönköping University.

Principles of Computer Systems
Author : Gerald M. Karam,John C. Bryant
Publisher : Englewood, NJ : Prentice Hall
Release Date : 1992
ISBN 10 : 9780131594685
Pages : 433 pages
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Describes computer system concepts in simple terms and offers information on how the low-level, compiler/interpreter activities of computers - arithmetic, I/O, array processing, character strings functions - are performed. A fictitious computer (CUSP), is used to exemplify the concepts discussed.

Computers as Components
Author : Wayne Wolf
Publisher : Morgan Kaufmann
Release Date : 2008-07-08
ISBN 10 : 9780080886213
Pages : 544 pages
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Computers as Components, Second Edition, updates the first book to bring essential knowledge on embedded systems technology and techniques under a single cover. This edition has been updated to the state-of-the-art by reworking and expanding performance analysis with more examples and exercises, and coverage of electronic systems now focuses on the latest applications. It gives a more comprehensive view of multiprocessors including VLIW and superscalar architectures as well as more detail about power consumption. There is also more advanced treatment of all the components of the system as well as in-depth coverage of networks, reconfigurable systems, hardware-software co-design, security, and program analysis. It presents an updated discussion of current industry development software including Linux and Windows CE. The new edition's case studies cover SHARC DSP with the TI C5000 and C6000 series, and real-world applications such as DVD players and cell phones. Researchers, students, and savvy professionals schooled in hardware or software design, will value Wayne Wolf's integrated engineering design approach. * Uses real processors (ARM processor and TI C55x DSP) to demonstrate both technology and techniques...Shows readers how to apply principles to actual design practice. * Covers all necessary topics with emphasis on actual design practice...Realistic introduction to the state-of-the-art for both students and practitioners. * Stresses necessary fundamentals which can be applied to evolving technologies...helps readers gain facility to design large, complex embedded systems that actually work.

Computer Architecture
Author : Joseph D. Dumas II
Publisher : CRC Press
Release Date : 2016-11-25
ISBN 10 : 1498772749
Pages : 462 pages
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Not only does almost everyone in the civilized world use a personal computer, smartphone, and/or tablet on a daily basis to communicate with others and access information, but virtually every other modern appliance, vehicle, or other device has one or more computers embedded inside it. One cannot purchase a current-model automobile, for example, without several computers on board to do everything from monitoring exhaust emissions, to operating the anti-lock brakes, to telling the transmission when to shift, and so on. Appliances such as clothes washers and dryers, microwave ovens, refrigerators, etc. are almost all digitally controlled. Gaming consoles like Xbox, PlayStation, and Wii are powerful computer systems with enhanced capabilities for user interaction. Computers are everywhere, even when we don’t see them as such, and it is more important than ever for students who will soon enter the workforce to understand how they work. This book is completely updated and revised for a one-semester upper level undergraduate course in Computer Architecture, and suitable for use in an undergraduate CS, EE, or CE curriculum at the junior or senior level. Students should have had a course(s) covering introductory topics in digital logic and computer organization. While this is not a text for a programming course, the reader should be familiar with computer programming concepts in at least one language such as C, C++, or Java. Previous courses in operating systems, assembly language, and/or systems programming would be helpful, but are not essential.

The Elements of Computing Systems
Author : Noam Nisan,Shimon Schocken
Publisher : Mit Press
Release Date : 2008
ISBN 10 : 0262640686
Pages : 325 pages
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This title gives students an integrated and rigorous picture of applied computer science, as it comes to play in the construction of a simple yet powerful computer system.

Real-Time Systems
Author : Hermann Kopetz
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2006-04-18
ISBN 10 : 0306470551
Pages : 338 pages
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7. 6 Performance Comparison: ET versus TT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 7. 7 The Physical Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Points to Remember . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Bibliographic Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Review Questions and Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Chapter 8: The Time-Triggered Protocols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 8. 1 Introduction to Time-Triggered Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 8. 2 Overview of the TTP/C Protocol Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 8. 3 TheBasic CNI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Internal Operation of TTP/C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 8. 4 8. 5 TTP/A for Field Bus Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Points to Remember. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Bibliographic Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Review Questions and Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Chapter 9: Input/Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 9. 1 The Dual Role of Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 9. 2 Agreement Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 9. 3 Sampling and Polling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 9. 4 Interrupts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 9. 5 Sensors and Actuators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 9. 6 Physical Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Points to Remember. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Bibliographic Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Review Questions and Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Chapter 10: Real-Time Operating Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 10. 1 Task Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 10. 2 Interprocess Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 10. 3 Time Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 10. 4 Error Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 10. 5 A Case Study: ERCOS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Points to Remember. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Bibliographic Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Review Questions and Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Chapter 11: Real-Time Scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 11. 1 The Scheduling Problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 11. 2 The Adversary Argument. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 11. 3 Dynamic Scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 x TABLE OF CONTENTS 11. 4 Static Scheduling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Points to Remember. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Bibliographic Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Review Questions and Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Chapter 12: Validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 12. 1 Building aConvincing Safety Case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 12. 2 Formal Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 12. 3 Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Autonomic Computing
Author : Philippe Lalanda,Julie A. McCann,Ada Diaconescu
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2013-05-13
ISBN 10 : 1447150074
Pages : 288 pages
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This textbook provides a practical perspective on autonomic computing. Through the combined use of examples and hands-on projects, the book enables the reader to rapidly gain an understanding of the theories, models, design principles and challenges of this subject while building upon their current knowledge. Features: provides a structured and comprehensive introduction to autonomic computing with a software engineering perspective; supported by a downloadable learning environment and source code that allows students to develop, execute, and test autonomic applications at an associated website; presents the latest information on techniques implementing self-monitoring, self-knowledge, decision-making and self-adaptation; discusses the challenges to evaluating an autonomic system, aiding the reader in designing tests and metrics that can be used to compare systems; reviews the most relevant sources of inspiration for autonomic computing, with pointers towards more extensive specialty literature.

System Design Automation
Author : Renate Merker,Wolfgang Schwarz
Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date : 2001-03-31
ISBN 10 : 9780792373131
Pages : 262 pages
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Design automation of electronic and hybrid systems is a steadily growing field of interest and a permanent challenge for researchers in Electronics, Computer Engineering and Computer Science. System Design Automation presents some recent results in design automation of different types of electronic and mechatronic systems. It deals with various topics of design automation, ranging from high level digital system synthesis, through analogue and heterogeneous system analysis and design, up to system modeling and simulation. Design automation is treated from the aspects of its theoretical fundamentals, its basic approach and its methods and tools. Several application cases are presented in detail. The book consists of three chapters: High-Level System Synthesis (Digital Hardware/Software Systems). Here embedded systems, distributed systems and processor arrays as well as hardware-software codesign are treated. Also three special application cases are discussed in detail; Analog and Heterogeneous System Design (System Approach and Methodology). This chapter copes with the analysis and design of hybrid systems comprised of analog and digital, electronic and mechanical components; System Simulation and Evaluation (Methods and Tools). In this chapter object-oriented Modelling, analog system simulation including fault-simulation, parameter optimization and system validation are regarded. The contents of the book are based on material presented at the Workshop System Design Automation (SDA 2000) organised by the Sonderforschungsbereich 358 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft at TU Dresden.

Reliability of Computer Systems and Networks
Author : Martin L. Shooman
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Release Date : 2003-04-08
ISBN 10 : 0471464066
Pages : 552 pages
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With computers becoming embedded as controllers in everything fromnetwork servers to the routing of subway schedules to NASAmissions, there is a critical need to ensure that systems continueto function even when a component fails. In this book, bestsellingauthor Martin Shooman draws on his expertise in reliabilityengineering and software engineering to provide a complete andauthoritative look at fault tolerant computing. He clearly explainsall fundamentals, including how to use redundant elements in systemdesign to ensure the reliability of computer systems andnetworks. Market: Systems and Networking Engineers, Computer Programmers, ITProfessionals.